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PL
09 07

An evening of musical stories. Wrap-up of the #4 day of the Festival

Women’s stories: love songs in Yiddish by Ola Bilińska, forgotten music of Warmia and Masuria by Ania Broda, the mysticism of Sufi poetry interwoven in the instrumental ceremony of the Iranian Homayoon ensemble, traditional Baul music of love and peace, performed by Debalina Bhowmick & Folk of Bengals and diversified and expressive musical narration of iconic Dikanda – all of that at the finale of this year’s edition of EtnoKraków/Crossroads Festival.
Women’s stories: love songs in Yiddish by Ola Bilińska, forgotten music of Warmia and Masuria by Ania Broda, the mysticism of Sufi poetry interwoven in the instrumental ceremony of the Iranian Homayoon ensemble, traditional Baul music of love and peace, performed by Debalina Bhowmick & Folk of Bengals and diversified and expressive musical narration of iconic Dikanda – all of that at the finale of this year’s edition of EtnoKraków/Crossroads Festival.
 
About feelings
The Saturday series of concerts began from the concert of Ola Bilińska with ensemble. They presented the project Libelid, the follow-up of Kołysanki Jidysz released three years ago (album: Berjozkele). It was a very atmospheric, subtle but at the same time ultra-modern story about the deepest feelings, resistant to time, about customs and human tragedies, told with understatement. The love sung in Yiddish. The artistic endeavours of the author of the project merged solemnity of tradition with the restless contemporary spirit. The musicians playing the cello, the harp, the contrabass and the trumpet appeared along with the vocalist and guitarist on the stage in the Galicia Jewish Museum. The sound of a quite unique set of instruments added some lightness and even more charm to the performance.

The story sung by Ania Broda was also about feelings. This time it was about her native region, which the artist has always in hear heart and on her mind. The Alchemia club filled with music of Warmia and Masuria. Captivating melodies and energy created an extraordinary experience of the little known Polish lake region.
 
About mysticism 
As soon as the rain stopped, a concert triad on Wolnica Square started. It was inaugurated by Iranian musicians of the Homayoon quartet. Their story has a dual message. First, its instrumental context. The artists presented a very high artistic standard performing Persian music using typical regional plucked instruments (tar, setar), percussion (daf, tombak) and the flute (ney). The vocals and the word added to the oriental trance and the sensual Middle Eastern sound. The ensemble’s music draws inspiration from poetry by the mystic Jalal ad-Din Muhammad ar Rumi. Notwithstanding rainy weather, the concert raised the audience’s enthusiasm.
 
About the elements 
Dikanda, celebrating its twentieth anniversary in this year, is a pioneer of world music scene in Poland. Its arte is based on the elements which constantly move their borders further and further. It is surprising, moving and rousing the audience to frenzy. The recipe for success of the ensemble now celebrating its anniversary seems to lie in its sincerity and undying passion for music. A large audience which gathered on Wolnica Square was carried away by the energy flowing from the stage and the square was filled with unbounded, sheer joy only rarely to be seen within the walls of our dignified city. Pieces from its previous records were on Dikanda’s repertoire on that evening, along with songs from their recent, not yet released record. It was a story about the elements of life in Europe – between the Baltic, the Tatras, in the shadow of the Carpathians, the Danube river bends, among Slavic, Gypsy and Jewish people, multicultural and open-hearted. The concert culminated with a spontaneous highlander chant by the charismatic leader of the ensemble, Anna Witczak-Czerniawska, and the Festival MC, the outstanding musician Krzysztof Trebunia-Tutka.
 
About love and peace 
The last concert of this year’s edition of EtnoKraków/Crossroads was the performance of Debalina Bhowmick and the Folks of Bengal ensemble from Calcutta. The audience had the opportunity to listen to native music of the Bauls, a small community living in India, whose influence on the culture of the country turns out to be in invert proportion to its population. The Bauls are itinerant singers, singing about peace and love. Traditional singing of that ethnic group entered on the UNESCO List of Oral and Intangible Heritage. The concert of Folks of Bengal helped to calm the audience down and smoothly conclude the Festival, building a bridge between the last and the first day of the Festival, when the Debashish Bhattachrya, coming from the same city, presented a completely different face of Indian music.